Monthly Archives: March 2016

Strategic planning workshops with Claire Madden & Paul Henderson

In times of rapid technological advancements, demographic shifts, generational transitions, global connectivity and social change, organisations need to clearly define their purpose and navigate the ever-changing consumer landscape effectively through a current and clear strategic plan. At Hello Clarity we facilitate strategic planning workshops to assist organisations to understand the external environment, review internal realities and plan for future strategic innovations. For organisations to effectively navigate the changing business and customer landscape, it is essential that strategic plans are developed with a detailed scan of the external environment, a robust analysis of the vision, strengths and capabilities of the organisation, a comprehensive review of stakeholder engagement, and a dedicated process to consider potential innovations and opportunities. At Hello Clarity, we work through a comprehensive strategic process which is collaborative, engaging and tailored to your specific sector and individual organisation. The recommended duration of a strategic planning workshop is 2-3 days, however input over shorter sessions can also be provided. Facilitators We have designed our consulting process to maximise the impact and effectiveness for our clients.  At Hello Clarity we believe in the strength of collaboration so our strategy workshops are facilitated by two facilitators who are both present throughout the duration of the workshops.  Our lead facilitators are Claire Madden and Paul Henderson. Claire Madden is a social researcher, media commentator, keynote presenter, TEDx speaker, business consultant and founder of Hello Clarity. She is in demand for her skill in effectively identifying the emerging trends and assisting business leaders to strategically respond to them. With academic qualifications in communications and postgraduate studies in leadership, Claire brings robust, research-based content to her engaging presentations and consulting. She is uniquely placed as an expert on social trends, organisational [...]

By | 2016-03-21T05:49:12+00:00 March 21st, 2016|Strategy|0 Comments

Learning with technology: 21st century classrooms

The emerging generations are saturated with technology... how do we ensure that technology in classrooms is a help and not a hindrance? Technology pervades nearly all aspects of our 21st century lives. Our calendars, communication, planning, recreation and memory making are seamlessly integrated into our devices and daily rhythms. The domain of education is included in this reality, as tablets and smart-boards make their way into classrooms across the nation and the developed world. However, these new tools present a range of challenges and opportunities for teachers, students and school bodies. As one OECD report argues, simply adding 21st century technologies to 20th century pedagogies “will just dilute the effectiveness of teaching.” Today’s students are saturated with technology, and come already with a high degree of tech literacy. It’s important that our schools recognise and direct these competencies to enrich the learning of our emerging generations. With that in mind, there are some key points to consider for ensuring that technology in classrooms is a help and not a hindrance. The following clarifying questions may help educators thinking about the structures of learning environments: Does current technology in your school align with the school mission and plan? Are technologies aligning with existing teaching practices, or is it necessary to shift some things to make better use of the tools available? Are teachers confident in using the tools, and do they recognise their benefits? Does the classroom or workspace layout foster effective use of available technologies? When used well, new technologies can help foster active learners, who are adept in accessing and creating shared resources, reflecting on discoveries, and developing as collaborative learners equipped for today and the future.

By | 2016-03-12T14:19:09+00:00 March 12th, 2016|Strategy|0 Comments

The 5 building blocks of an organisation

[one_half last="no" spacing="yes" center_content="no" hide_on_mobile="no" background_color="" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_position="left top" hover_type="none" link="" border_position="all" border_size="0px" border_color="" border_style="" padding="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" animation_type="" animation_direction="" animation_speed="0.1" animation_offset="" class="" id=""] A consistent organisational voice begins with clarifying purpose and priorities - that is, why we exist and what we value. From here, we can start to analyse products, processes, and people – what we do, how we do it, and who we are. [/one_half][one_half last="yes" spacing="yes" center_content="no" hide_on_mobile="no" background_color="" background_image="https://helloclarity.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Stage5.jpg" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_position="left top" hover_type="none" link="" border_position="all" border_size="0px" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" animation_type="0" animation_direction="down" animation_speed="0.1" animation_offset="" class="" id=""][/one_half][one_full last="yes" spacing="yes" center_content="no" hide_on_mobile="no" background_color="" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_position="left top" hover_type="none" link="" border_position="all" border_size="0px" border_color="" border_style="" padding="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" animation_type="" animation_direction="" animation_speed="0.1" animation_offset="" class="" id=""] Organisations are complex environments. Decades of organisational and management research has produced a myriad of ways for understanding organisations. Systems theory, ecosystem metaphors, structural studies, power analyses and the like have all emerged. While valuable, the sheer volume of material in this domain can be difficult to navigate. At Hello Clarity we assist organisations in helping them identify their core strengths, brand identity, internal culture and external engagement. It’s critical that we are intentional about the brand voice we develop, and communicate culture and message consistently in our internal and external interactions. Consistency is key between what we say and how we function. [/one_full][three_fifth last="no" spacing="yes" center_content="no" hide_on_mobile="no" background_color="" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_position="left top" hover_type="none" link="" border_position="all" border_size="0px" border_color="" border_style="" padding="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" animation_type="" animation_direction="" animation_speed="0.1" animation_offset="" class="" id=""]A consistent organisational voice begins with clarifying purpose and priorities - that is, why we exist and what we value. From here, we can start to analyse products, processes, and people – what we do, how we do it, and [...]

By | 2016-03-01T18:13:52+00:00 March 1st, 2016|Strategy|0 Comments

Building effective teams

[one_half last="no" spacing="yes" center_content="no" hide_on_mobile="no" background_color="" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_position="left top" hover_type="none" link="" border_position="all" border_size="0px" border_color="" border_style="" padding="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" animation_type="" animation_direction="" animation_speed="0.1" animation_offset="" class="" id=""] As our workplaces are becoming increasingly diverse... it is vital that we reflect on how we communicate our organisation's values, propagate a healthy workplace culture and prioritise people over projects. [/one_half][one_half last="yes" spacing="yes" center_content="no" hide_on_mobile="no" background_color="" background_image="https://helloclarity.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Collaborate_Image.jpg" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_position="left top" hover_type="none" link="" border_position="all" border_size="0px" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" animation_type="0" animation_direction="down" animation_speed="0.1" animation_offset="" class="" id=""][/one_half][one_full last="yes" spacing="yes" center_content="no" hide_on_mobile="no" background_color="" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_position="left top" hover_type="none" link="" border_position="all" border_size="0px" border_color="" border_style="" padding="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" animation_type="" animation_direction="" animation_speed="0.1" animation_offset="" class="" id=""] You may have seen an article published last week in The New York Times Magazine on Google's quest to create the "perfect team". Bringing in research by some of the brightest minds, 'Project Aristotle' sought to detect patterns in Google's best and worst performing teams. Why is it some working communities seem to 'click' while others just don't? All in all, the research didn't make any particularly groundbreaking discoveries. The best teams were ones where everyone had a chance to contribute equally and where there was a good level of social understanding between the people involved. But perhaps the strength of the project lies in its ability to remind us of what we already know but can all too easily forget amid the various daily pressures and demands of our working lives: the most productive teams are made up of people who trust each other and feel safe enough to contribute their ideas. How do we build trust within our organisations? How do we show value to each member of our teams? As our workplaces are becoming increasingly diverse and several generations are sharing office space, it is vital that we reflect on how we [...]

By | 2016-03-01T17:36:28+00:00 March 1st, 2016|Strategy|0 Comments